Skip to main content
Version: Python

How to install Java packages

This guide discusses how to install Java packages for use with Deephaven by adding to the Deephaven Docker images so that they are available every time Deephaven is launched.

Once a package is installed, it can be imported and used like any other Java package.

caution

If a Java package has dependencies that Deephaven does not have, those packages will not work unless the required dependencies are installed as well. Java packages can also have dependencies that conflict with Deephaven's, so it's important to be careful when adding Java packages.

List all available Java packages

You can check what Java packages are available to Deephaven by running the following command from your Deephaven installation while Deephaven is running.

docker-compose exec server ls libs

Add packages to a custom Docker image

In order to use Java packages within Deephaven, you must put the associated .jar files in the /apps/libs directory of your server image.

In this section, we add the Java CryptoCompare API client to a custom Dockerfile and reference it from Deephaven so that we can use it in more than one session.

In order to use packages more than once, you can create a custom Docker image, and then use that image in Deephaven. The steps for accomplishing this differ slightly depending on how you launch Deephaven. Let's start with the steps that are common between both.

Prerequisites

Before a custom Docker image can be built, you must acquire the necessary base images. This process differs based upon how you launch Deephaven:

docker-compose pull

Create a custom Dockerfile

To begin, create a new directory. This directory should not be in a Deephaven deployment directory. You can name it whatever you'd like. For this guide, we'll name ours deephaven-custom.

mkdir deephaven-custom
cd deephaven-custom

Now, in this directory, create a file called Dockerfile. Dockerfile should use ghcr.io/deephaven/server as the base image and should contain a recipe for installing the new package. When adding the Java CryptoCompare API client, it looks like this:

FROM ghcr.io/deephaven/server
RUN curl --output /apps/libs
https://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/github/jeffreytai/cryptocompare-api-wrapper/1.0.0/cryptocompare-api-wrapper-1.0.0.jar

Create a custom Docker image

Now that we have the Dockerfile in place, we need to create the custom Docker image. To do so, run a command from the directory with Dockerfile that looks like:

docker build --tag <user>/server-<custom> .

This creates a new Docker image named <user>/server-<custom>. For this guide, we will call the image guide/server-cryptocompare:

docker build --tag guide/server-cryptocompare .

When the command finishes running, you can see the new image in your system:

docker image ls

Reference the new image

To put it all together, we now need to reference this new image in the docker-compose file we use to launch Deephaven. The particular file depends on how you build and launch Deephaven:

In the Docker Compose file, there are three lines of text that look like:

services:
server:
image: <IMAGE_NAME>

The image used by default depends on how you build and launch Deephaven. Regardless, this line is where you need to insert your custom image name. Modify the image line to use your new image:

services:
server:
image: guide/server-cryptocompare:latest

Now, when you launch Deephaven again, you can use the package!

caution

When base images are updated by rebuilding source code or redownloading pre-built images, custom images must be rebuilt to incorporate the base image changes.

List all available Java packages

You can check what Java packages are available to Deephaven by running the following command from your Deephaven installation while Deephaven is running.

docker-compose exec server ls /apps/libs